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popcorn_100Wouldn't a little Popcorn help you relax when watching a movie at home? We thought so! How about an affectionate little funny tortoiseshell, about 8 months old named "Popcorn"!

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Paige_smallLoving is Not the Word...
Tinkerbelle and Paige were 2 homeless kittens brought to Save-A-Life by a kind person who did not want them left outside in the cold.

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freeway_smallLucky Freeway Kitty!
Picture this: Rolling down the freeway, a lady spots a tiny, frightened black kitten—surely doomed! She not only stops—but so do all the other cars—don't ask me how!

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Adoption Success!

charming_smallA Charming Success
The Best Friends Super Adoption Fair worked like a charm... for beautiful little "Charm", who had been given up by her family when they had to move.

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Home Newsletter Cat Tips Old Friends Develop Special Needs!
Old Friends Develop Special Needs!

catteeth_bigAs our little darlings age, the rules of the cat wellbeing game (that you thought you had finally mastered) change. Hopefully, every kitty will have had regular dental checkups, cleanings and extractions as needed along the way. However, if your double-digit feline hasn't been checked in a while, it's time to make an appointment.

Dental health and diet are perhaps the most important factors in your cat's longevity. Buildups of plaque and calculus (tartar) on your pet's teeth lead to gingivitis, bad breath, tooth loss and eating difficulties. Plaque and calculus harbor bacteria that can contribute to other local and systemic diseases such as kidney and hyper thyroid diseases.

Crunching on dry kibble alone cannot keep the teeth and mouth in peak condition. As your cat ages, she may also become more fond of canned food—particularly if her teeth and gums are sore.

Your vet can tell you exactly what treatment plan is right according to the state of the teeth and your cat's temperament/overall health. Because my 17 year-old cat Ridley rather frail after battling a variety of medical issues, our veterinarian and I both agreed that a dental procedure with full anesthesia might be too stressful for him. He's the love of my life, but he has little patience for claw clipping, ear cleaning, etc. So, as his breath grew putrid and he struggled to eat, I searched for alternatives.

Houndstooth non-anesthetic veterinary dental service in Los Angles was the answer! Their technician came to my house and using gentle relaxation techniques, she cleaned Ridley's mouth with nary a hiss or a scratch! Ridley felt so much better after the procedure and his breath was noticeably better, too!

"The results of a non-anesthetic cleaning are the same as a routine cleaning at the vet's," the Houndstooth website explains. 
Pets with behavioral issues and advanced dental conditions may have some slight compromise, but most results are 80-95%. 
Very neglected mouths will require more than one appointment to restore oral health but this easy house-call method makes that easy on your old friend and on you!

Visit the Houndstooth website or call (310) 835-1919, 
(818) 592-0383, (877) 309-8849. Email inquiries to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . They are on Facebook, too!

Peace and Blessings to all wonderful animal parents, everywhere,
Nan Eichelberger
president, Save-A-Life Animal Adoptions

 
 
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